Resource Conservation Districts


RCDs work on local conservation projects, and sometimes organize citizen involvement.  Here, the Central Modoc RCD hosts a citizen’s water quality monitoring event.
Photo: Central Modoc RCD

Resource Conservation Districts (RCDs) are “special districts” set up under California state law. They are governed locally by a volunteer board of directors. The districts work closely with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), and act as liaisons between the federal government and local landowners and organizations.

RCDs address a variety of issues, including wildlife habitat restoration, fire fuels management, water and air quality, and soil erosion control. They complete on-the-ground projects in both urban and rural areas, and educate landowners and other stakeholders about conservation issues.

Natural resources are significantly impacted by invasive plants, which can increase fire hazards and reduce native wildlife habitat. Since the success of their goals for resource conservation is closely tied to their ability to control invasive plants, RCDs are often key partners in Weed Management Areas.

RCDs in the Sacramento River Watershed

Other RCD links

The California Association of Resource Conservation Districts coordinates district activities. Their webpage is home to the Watershed Information Sharing Project, which can help you find an RCD in your area.